January 2019 Cost Breakdown

Now that I’ve owned my car for over 4 months, I started to understand my car. Where I used to have range anxiety before, I have gotten extremely comfortable with my car that I’m willing to push the limits.

That said, I knew that I can pretty much rely on charging at work without needing to charge at home. I’ve made it 27 days before I was forced to charge at home.

The only reason why I charged at home was that I came home from Anaheim the day before and was heading to the airport the next day. I was too lazy to head to the Supercharger to charge my car. At the time, the closest one to me is the one located Downtown, which cost $5 to enter the parking structure. The next closest is 11 mins away and usually packed. So I decided to just plug it in via a 110V outlet. So let’s breakdown my usage.

As I haven’t received my Performance refund yet, I’m still getting free Supercharging. Let’s start with how much. Earlier in the month, the Supercharger at Camino Del Sur opened up. So I went there several times to check it out. The other thing I wanted to point out was the Downtown location at A Street. The reason why it cost me $5 was that it was a paid parking garage. Altogether I’ve added 204.92 kWh and saved $60.01.

The majority of my charging was done at work. I don’t always get to charge all the way, but for the most part, I get enough to get home and get back to work. At work, I was able to add 267.61 and saved $106.13 compared to charging at my home during the same time.

Outside of the superchargers and charging at work, I did end up charging at Volta. Volta provides free L2 charging. There are two outlets located by the grocery store by my house. Usually, they are always occupied, but I was able to get lucky one day. Only added 8.52 kWh which saved me $3.38 compared to what it would have cost to charge at home during the same time.

As for my home usage, my charging started at midnight when I’m in the “Super Off-Peak” rate. I continued to charge during the “Off-Peak” rate and tried to turn it off it’s considered “On-Peak”. Since I’m charging on 110V, I’m getting slow rates to charge, so it took a couple of days to get back to 90% from 20%. My total cost was $18.77 when adding 75.80 kWh during that period!

I drove 1178.22 miles in the month of January. That’s a rate of $0.016 per every mile I drove! There’s no way I could have done something similar in an ICE vehicle! To put things in perspective, I’ve actually spent more money on my coffee at Starbucks than I did to charge my car.

As I continue into February, I’ll probably continue to a mix of charging at home vs work. It’ll also be interesting to see how my charging habits change now that I have received the refund on my Performance Model 3. I expect that I will be back to pay per use supercharging by mid-month!


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